D.O.A

"We make you dead on arrival!"
That's right. Be scared.

Sunday, May 4, 2014

Songs from the Civil War

Battle Cry of Freedom


Yes, we'll rally round the flag, boys,
  We'll rally once again,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom,
  We will rally from the hillside,
We'll gather from the plain,
  Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.


CHORUS: The Union forever,
  Hurrah! boys, hurrah!
Down with the traitors,
  Up with the stars;
While we rally round the flag, boys,
  Rally once again,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.


We are springing to the call
  Of our brothers gone before,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom;
And we'll fill our vacant ranks with
  A million free men more,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.


We will welcome to our numbers
  The loyal, true and brave,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom;
And although they may be poor,
  Not a man shall be a slave,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.


So we're springing to the call
  From the East and from the West,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom;
And we'll hurl the rebel crew
  From the land that we love best,
Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.




“The Battle Cry of Freedom” was an extremely popular song among the people of the Union during the Civil War. It was very patriotic, and it was used as a campaign song for Lincoln in the election of 1864. It was composed by George Frederick Root and it advocated the Union cause. It was later adapted into another version for the Confederate States of America. This song was encouraging and raised the morale of Union soldiers.


Lorena


The years creep slowly by, Lorena,
The snow is on the grass again,
The sun's low down the sky, Lorena,
The frost gleams where the flow'rs have been.
But the heart throbs on as warmly now,
As when the summer days were nigh;
Oh! The sun can never dip so low,
Adown affection's cloudless sky.
The sun can never dip so low,
Adown affection's cloudless sky.


A hundred months have pass'd Lorena,
Since last I held that hand in mine,
And felt the pulse beat fast, Lorena,
Tho' mine beat faster far than thine.
A hundred months, 'twas flow'ry May,
When up the hilly slope we climbed,
To watch the dying of the day,
And hear the distant churchbells chimed.
To watch the dying of the day,
And hear the distant churchbells chimed.


We loved each other then Lorena,
More than we ever dared to tell;
And what we might have been, Lorena,
Had but our lovings prosper'd well
But then, 'tis past-the years are gone,
I'll not call up their shadowy forms;
I'll say to them, "lost years, sleep on!
Sleep on! Nor heed, life's pelting storm."
I'll say to them, "lost years, sleep on!
Sleep on! Nor heed, life's pelting storm."




Lorena is a poem written by Rev Henry D. L. Webster after his engagement didn’t work out. The lyrics are about his fiancée and the song became a favorite of both armies during the war. The soldiers fighting in the Civil War often thought of their wives or girlfriends back home, so they would sing this song when they were homesick. It was a Northern antebellum song, which means it existed before the war.This song was also very popular, and it sometimes made the soldiers sad and even more homesick after they sang it.



When Johnny Comes Marching Home


When Johnny comes marching home again
Hurrah! Hurrah!
We'll give him a hearty welcome then
Hurrah! Hurrah!
The men will cheer and the boys will shout
The ladies they will all turn out
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.
The old church bell will peal with joy
Hurrah! Hurrah!
To welcome home our darling boy,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
The village lads and lassies say
With roses they will strew the way,
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.
Get ready for the Jubilee,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
We'll give the hero three times three,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
The laurel wreath is ready now
To place upon his loyal brow
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.
Let love and friendship on that day,
Hurrah, hurrah!
Their choicest pleasures then display,
Hurrah, hurrah!
And let each one perform some part,
To fill with joy the warrior's heart,
And we'll all feel gay
When Johnny comes marching home.




(lyrics are a little different because there are different versions)
“When Johnny Comes Marching Home” expresses people’s longing for their friends and family to come home from war. It is about missing people and wanting them to return. This song was written by Patrick Gilmore who served in the Union army during the war. It was sung by both armies, and it even became a hit in England. The melody of this song was similar to many Irish folk songs.

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